The tombstone of Lincoln’s ‘jet necklace’ lady

The tombstones of numerous residents of Roman Lincoln have been discovered through the years, providing a fascinating, if fragmentary, insight into the city’s occupants – or at least those who could afford such grand funerary monuments. One tombstone appears to not be very well known and, as it will soon be going on display at The Collection museum for the first time in many decades, is worthy of highlighting here. Continue reading

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Portable healing? Snake jewellery in Roman Lincolnshire

Items of jewellery represent some of the most attractive finds from Roman Britain, and the wide variety of forms of brooches, rings and bracelets can tell us much about changing fashions and clothing styles. Some jewellery, however, is more than simply practical or decorative, and it is one such form that I wish to look at the Lincolnshire evidence for here – the fascinating phenomenon of finger rings and bracelets bearing snake imagery. Continue reading

Souvenirs from Hadrian’s Wall? Two enamelled copper alloy vessels from North Lincolnshire

Tourism in the ancient world is a fascinating subject, and we should not assume that either the desire or the ability to travel and see the great sites of the world are modern phenomena. Just as today, tourism was accompanied by the acquisition of souvenirs and mementos and it is two potential souvenirs from Hadrian’s Wall that I want to discuss here. Continue reading

The possible Roman vineyard at North Thoresby

The possibility of the discovery of Roman vine cultivation at the Eastern Bypass excavations, combined with a brief conversation on twitter with Dr Eleanor Scott and Dr Caitlin Green, made me think it was worth taking a quick look here at the other suggested evidence of a vineyard in Lincolnshire, at North Thoresby. Continue reading

The Horkstow chariot mosaic: sporting depiction or allegory of fate?

I’ve mentioned the large and wonderful mosaic pavement from the Horkstow villa a couple of times in recent posts, but it seems remiss of me not to have discussed its best known and most significant element – the depiction of a dramatic chariot race, unique in Britain. Continue reading

Lincoln’s Eastern Bypass excavations in British Archaeology magazine

The important ongoing excavations at Washingborough as part of the construction of Lincoln’s new Eastern Bypass are featured in the latest issue (September/October 2017) of the Council for British Archaeology’s ‘British Archaeology’ magazine. Continue reading