Outsiders and executions? An important new Roman cemetery near Sleaford

Roman burials in Lincolnshire have been a source of immense interest in recent years (see my post on some previous discoveries here) and the trend looks to continue with news of a fascinating burial group excavated by local archaeologists Allen Archaeology in 2012, the report of which I have just seen. Continue reading

For the public good? Euergetism in Roman Lincolnshire

Towns in the Roman Empire did not develop primarily through centralised state support. Although certain actions, such as the construction of defensive walls, may have required specific imperial permission and in some cases received official support from the provincial government or army in the form of money or manpower, most public structures relied instead on the benevolence of prominent local citizens. This act of giving one’s own resources to improve the communal urban environment is known as ‘euergetism’. Continue reading

Slavery in Roman Lincolnshire

Slavery was an accepted part of the economy in the ancient world. Defeated peoples might expect to have been enslaved by their conquerors, and the desperation of poverty could lead to children being sold to slave traders to provide money for the family. In desperately sad situations, entering or being sold into slavery may have been the only chance to avoid starvation.  Continue reading

Stories from stones – Roman gems lecture

Its been an excellent week for Roman lectures here in Lincoln, with the Lincolnshire Archaeology Day at the weekend, and now Dr Ian Marshman’s excellent lecture to the Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology. Speaking on the subject of Roman signet rings and their intaglios, Ian took his audience on a fascinating and enthusiastic journey through the function, subject matter and antiquarian interest in these smallest of artistic depictions.

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