Ballista bolts, brooches and pots: early Roman military activity at Lincoln

In a post last month, I wrote about the fascinating discovery of a pair of important new late Roman burials on the hillside just east of Roman Lincoln’s lower enclosure. In that post I briefly mentioned some of the early Roman evidence uncovered during that excavation and said I’d come back to it later. Well, folks, that time is now! Continue reading

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Pursuing the Pomerium: The Ritual and Reality of the Sacred Boundary of Lindum Colonia

This post reproduces a paper of mine published in Volume 49 of the Lincolnshire History  and Archaeology Journal, exploring the ancient archaeological and literary evidence for the existence of sacred boundaries (pomeria) surrounding Roman towns and the possibility of such a boundary being perceived by the citizens of Roman Lincoln. Continue reading

Brooches, buckles and fabric: Two significant new late Roman burials from Lincoln

Excavations at the site of the University Technical College in Lincoln in 2014 by Lincolnshire archaeologists Allen Archaeology uncovered two fascinating and important late Roman burials, the report on which I have just seen and would like to share the details of here. Continue reading

An offering to Bacchus? An unusual copper alloy candlestick from Branston

My previous post looked at the fascinating memorial to Aurelia Concessa from Branston, and I’d like to do something of a follow up post here by highlighting another significant find made not too far away from it. This particular object is a complete copper alloy candlestick – a rare find from Roman Britain, and one with potential religious connotations. Continue reading

Casting doubt on coinage: ceramic coin counterfeiting moulds from Lincolnshire

For as long as there have been coins there have been people willing to risk the, usually severe, penalties for counterfeiting them. Unofficial versions of Roman coinage are regularly found across the Roman Empire, sometimes the output of con-artists seeking to defraud, and sometimes products of necessity to counter a wider shortage of low value coinage. This latter type of counterfeiting was perhaps sanctioned by the authorities, or at least had a blind eye turned to it. Continue reading