Lincoln’s Eastern Bypass excavations in British Archaeology magazine

The important ongoing excavations at Washingborough as part of the construction of Lincoln’s new Eastern Bypass are featured in the latest issue (September/October 2017) of the Council for British Archaeology’s ‘British Archaeology’ magazine. Continue reading

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Roman stone floor unearthed at Lincoln’s Eastern Bypass excavations

The ongoing excavations at Lincoln’s Eastern Bypass have produced some incredible multi-period archaeology. I have discussed some of the Romano-British findings in various earlier posts (see below), but the excavations continue to reveal more of the Roman structures and activity. The latest update from the site is of the discovery of an impressive stone floor surface. Continue reading

Animal print tiles at Lincoln’s Eastern Bypass excavations

The excavations at Washingborough currently taking place as part of the construction of Lincoln’s eastern bypass have most definitely captured people’s imagination, and with good reason as the results are proving fascinating (see my earlier posts here and here). As part of the publicity surrounding the project, a ‘find of the week’ is being chosen by the excavators and published in the Lincolnshire Echo. This week’s highlight is a Roman object, in the form of a roof tile complete with a perfect paw print. Continue reading

Media coverage of the Lincoln Eastern bypass excavations

I posted a little piece a few weeks ago on the discoveries at the ongoing excavations for Lincoln’s new Eastern bypass (read it here). I don’t remember noticing the local media covering it at the time, but it seems they have just caught on, so I thought I’d post links to their online articles here. Continue reading

Villas and vineyards? Excavations on the route of Lincoln’s eastern bypass

A new newsletter detailing the progress of excavations along the route of Lincoln’s Eastern Bypass (downloadable here) has revealed that the project is turning up some exciting new evidence of Roman activity in the Washingborough area. Some of it has the potential to turn our understanding of the hinterland of Roman Lincoln on its head. Continue reading