The tombstone of Lincoln’s ‘jet necklace’ lady

The tombstones of numerous residents of Roman Lincoln have been discovered through the years, providing a fascinating, if fragmentary, insight into the city’s occupants – or at least those who could afford such grand funerary monuments. One tombstone appears to not be very well known and, as it will soon be going on display at The Collection museum for the first time in many decades, is worthy of highlighting here. Continue reading

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A previously unidentified giant from Roman Lincolnshire

No, this isn’t a post about very tall people, but about mythological giants – the race of creatures in Greek and Roman mythology who played an important role in the story of the establishment of the Olympian pantheon. They are not commonly encountered in a Romano-British context, but are depicted on one of Lincolnshire finest mosaics and on a previously unidentified copper alloy statuette which I believe also represents a giant. Continue reading

An unusual ceramic mould from Lincoln’s forum colonnade

The discovery of the eastern colonnade of Lincoln’s forum in 1878 still ranks as one of the most important archaeological finds in the city’s history. When George Allis began digging the foundations of a new house on Bailgate in late April 1878, he could little have suspected that he would soon be discovering the base of a large, sandstone Roman column, or that further work would eventually lead to an entire colonnade of 19 such columns, subsequently to be understood as the eastern edge of the town’s forum. This dramatic discovery is worthy of a blog post in itself at some point in the future (I use a photograph of it as the header image for this blog), but here I want to focus on just one rather unusual object discovered during the excavations – a ceramic mould depicting a side-on female portrait. Continue reading

Henry Preston and the recording of some antiquarian objects from Roman Saltersford

The antiquarian Henry Preston (1852-1940) is an important, but often overlooked, figure in Lincolnshire archaeology. He was  instrumental in the establishment of Grantham Museum in 1926, having previously founded the Grantham Scientific Society in 1890. His personal collections of artefacts and his records of them are a core part of the Grantham Museum collections. Continue reading